Lipo-chitooligosaccharides as regulatory signals of fungal growth and development

20 août 2020 par Super Administrateur [TheChamp-Sharing]
We have just published the results of our international collaboration with American Universities (University of Wisconsin – Madison, University of Tennessee - Knoxville, University of California - Santa Barbara) and Toulouse laboratories (CNRS, University of Toulouse, IRD, INRAE) in the prestigious journal Nature communications. Our work shows that lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs), which are signaling molecules produced by rhizobial bacteria and by certain fungi that also establish symbiotic relationships with plants, are actually produced by many species of fungi. Our results suggest that LCOs production is common among fungi and that oligosaccharides may function as signals regulating the growth and development of fungi.

Abstract:
“Lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs) are signaling molecules produced by rhizobial bacteria that trigger the nodulation process in legumes, and by some fungi that also establish symbiotic relationships with plants, notably the arbuscular and ecto mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we show that many other fungi also produce LCOs. We tested 59 species representing most fungal phyla, and found that 53 species produce LCOs that can be detected by functional assays and/or by mass spectroscopy. LCO treatment affects spore germination, branching of hyphae, pseudohyphal growth, and transcription in non-symbiotic fungi from the Ascomycete and Basidiomycete phyla. Our findings suggest that LCO production is common among fungi, and LCOs may function as signals regulating fungal growth and development.”

Our publication is availaible here:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-17615-5